Tyson Fury: ‘The Tyson that beat Wladimir Klitschko is dead and gone’

Lineal heavyweight champion Tyson Fury. Photo credit: Esther Lin/Showtime

Lineal heavyweight champion Tyson Fury. Photo credit: Esther Lin/Showtime

 

At the midway point of an eight-week camp in Big Bear, California, lineal heavyweight champion Tyson Fury came down the mountain for a media workout in Santa Monica, on Wednesday afternoon, and gave everyone an update on how training is going ahead of his December 1 fight with WBC titlist Deontay Wilder.

 

“Everything is going well in Big Bear,” Fury said in a media scrum. “There’s not much distraction up there; the air is thin, clean, cold…It’s very hard training. I’m enjoying every minute of it and it’s going to prepare me very good for the fight.”

 

Fury, 27-0 (19), looked like someone who had spent some time in the mountains for awhile; however the thick beard was not an ode to the sequestered lifestyle but a $1000 charity bet with a team member to make things mildly interesting in an isolated cabin.

 

“I don’t have any free time,” Fury proclaimed. “When I’m not training, I’m thinking about training. When I’m not thinking about training, I’m sleeping. When I’m not sleeping, I’m eating. When I’m not eating, I’m resting. I don’t leave Big Bear.

 

Lineal heavyweight champion Tyson Fury (right). Photo credit: Esther Lin/Showtime

Lineal heavyweight champion Tyson Fury (right). Photo credit: Esther Lin/Showtime

 

“I’ve been isolated many, many times in training camps. I’ve based myself in Holland in the middle of a forest – 10 miles from any shop or town or anything. That was for the (Wladimir) Klitschko fight (in November 2015), so I’m used to being away and in hostile environments.“

 

Holding camp at Abel Sanchez’s Summit gym, this is the first training camp in high altitude for Fury, who admitted it being difficult, at first, and mentioned a trip down to sea level last week, in order to see how his body would react.

 

“It’s been very hard, to be honest,” Fury admitted. “Very hard. The air is thin up there and it’s very hard to breathe. I came over there and I was already very fit. I could spar 12 rounds, fight on the pads and work 15 rounds, no problem. I come here and I’m tired after three or four rounds. I went down the mountain to Ontario last week, just to check if everything was going right because I was feeling very tired in the gym. I was thinking, ‘Is this really for me? – Do I need this?’”

 

There was no second guessing, once Fury worked out at the base of the mountains – saying he worked very hard in the session and was ‘very fast and very fit.’ Fury went on to mention that sparring has been going very well with Joe Joyce, who recently hired Sanchez as his trainer, and is evidently reaping the benefits of working in a highly-regarded gym. Ben Davison – Fury’s trainer since the start of the calendar year – has been in Big Bear too, of course, and participated in some light pad work with Fury, in which the behemoth heavyweight showed glimpses of his nimble boxing ability to the media.

 

Lineal heavyweight champion Tyson Fury. Photo credit: Esther Lin/Showtime

Lineal heavyweight champion Tyson Fury. Photo credit: Esther Lin/Showtime

 

“I’m not really focusing on weight,” Fury proclaimed. “For the first time in me whole career, I came into camp on weight. I came in at about 263, so I’m probably going to weigh on the night, 260. I’m gonna be heavy. I’m a big, giant man. I’ve got a big beard and a bald head and I’m gonna put it all on him on the night.”

 

In the main event of a Showtime Pay-Per-View card taking place at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, Fury will challenge Wilder, 40-0 (39), for the WBC heavyweight title and attempt to recapture the glory of becoming heavyweight champion again. However he’d quickly remind you of the lineal champion status he achieved in beating Wladimir Klitschko three years ago.

 

“It’s a pretty easy fight to analyze really,” Fury said about the match-up. “Deontay Wilder needs to land that big right hand to detonate me and knock me out and I need to not let him do that, basically. So I’ve got to do whatever I can to not let him hit me with that big right hand. But he’s gotta worry about getting out of the way of my punches too.

 

“I don’t want what he has. I just want to beat him in a fight and then he can go on about his business and I can do mine. It ain’t personal. I just want to beat the best when they are the best. Because if this is going to be my era, then I’ve got to beat all comers.”

 

Lineal heavyweight champion Tyson Fury. Photo credit: Esther Lin/Showtime

Lineal heavyweight champion Tyson Fury. Photo credit: Esther Lin/Showtime

 

Fury, who turned 30 last August, has had two warm-up fights in the months leading up to facing Wilder. Although those outings where more of a process to get Fury back into shape after a subsequent fallout from boxing, once beating Klitschko, he didn’t skip a beat, in terms of being a key for the fight’s promotion in a tri-city press tour that preceded training camp.

 

Whether Fury doesn’t skip a beat in the boxing ring still remains to be seen but the brimming confidence of the man who beat the man hasn’t changed, even though the former is long gone.

 

“The Tyson that beat Klitschko is dead and gone,” Fury said. “He don’t exist anymore – that was years ago. I don’t live in the past. I only live for today and tomorrow. Whatever happened yesterday is history.”

 

 

 

You can reach Michael Baca II at mikebaca2@gmail.com and follow him at twitter.com/mikebaca2

 

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