Showtime results: Errol Spence Jr. sacks Carlos Ocampo in one

IBF welterweight titlist Errol Spence Jr. (left) vs. Carlos Ocampo. Photo credit: Stacey Verbeek

IBF welterweight titlist Errol Spence Jr. (left) vs. Carlos Ocampo. Photo credit: Stacey Verbeek

 

Errol “The Truth” Spence Jr. wiped out Carlos Ocampo in the first round to successfully defend his IBF welterweight title a second time, and conclude a homecoming long overdue. The fight was the main event of a Showtime tripleheader on Saturday night.

 

“I’m a little disappointed. I wanted to give the crowd their money’s worth,” Spence said in the post-fight interview with Showtime’s Jim Gray. “I wanted him to take a little bit more punishment but the body shot landed right on point and it dropped him.”

 

In the final seconds of the first, Spence, 24-0 (21), landed a perfect left hook to Ocampo’s body and quickly followed it up with a right hook to the ribs before the Mexican went down into his knees in pain. With referee Laurence Cole shouting his count, Ocampo, 22-1 (13), crouched forward into the fetal position but couldn’t even muster up the will to even try to get up before Cole reached 10. Ocampo, the IBF’s No.3-ranked welterweight and mandatory opponent for Spence, even laid back down once it was all over, and stared up at the ceiling of the Ford Center at the Star in Frisco, Texas.

 

Some 14,000 fans showed up to see the their hometown champion finally have his formal homecoming, and the event signifies the rapid growth of his rising star. Spence, a 28-year-old southpaw, was patient in his attack leading up to the knockout. Midway through the first, a straight left hand popped Ocampo in the nose and it slowed down his active pace, to start. Ocampo landed some body shots but the separation in class could already be seen until the moment it materialized.

 

But the event was more important than the match-up itself, and a week after Terence “Bud” Crawford made his debut at 147 pounds by defeating Jeff Horn for the WBO title, Spence, DeSoto, Texas, countered his Omaha, Nebraska, rival with a night that proved it could one day be the biggest showdown in boxing, let alone the division.

 

In the co-feature, Daniel Roman successfully defended his WBA junior featherweight title a second time after earning a unanimous decision (120-108, 118-110, 116-112) over Moises “Chucky” Flores.

 

WBA junior featherweight titlist Danny Roman (left) vs. Moises Flores. Photo credit: Stacey Verbeek

WBA junior featherweight titlist Danny Roman (left) vs. Moises Flores. Photo credit: Stacey Verbeek

 

Roman, 25-2-1 (9), put a tactical beatdown on Flores, over the course of 12 rounds. His well-rounded style focused on his Mexican counterpart’s body to start, making precise combinations upstairs easier to find, by the midway rounds, and Roman seemed to be on the brink of getting him out of there a few times in the late rounds. Flores, 25-1 (17), was getting out-dueled but did present action that made it a palatable fight. He was even making a couple middle rounds close but Roman peppered Flores with quick combinations too easily and too often. Flores tired by the late rounds, and was even a bad Texas stoppage away from not making it out of the 12th. He wasn’t eligible to win the title after missing weight yesterday but Flores tried his best before losing for the first time in his career.

 

In the opening bout of the Showtime telecast, a strange turn of events in the fourth round had Javier Fortuna whisked away in a stretcher, bringing his fight with Adrian Granados to an abrupt halt and an eventual no-decision ruling from the Texas commission. The junior welterweight contest was scheduled for 10 rounds.

 

Junior welterweight Adrian Granados (left) vs. Javier Fortuna. Photo credit: Stacey Verbeek

Junior welterweight Adrian Granados (left) vs. Javier Fortuna. Photo credit: Stacey Verbeek

 

It wasn’t necessarily going smoothly for three rounds but that’s just like any other fight involving the quirky Dominican, who finally got deducted a point by referee Robert Chapa early in the fourth, and docked another, moments later for holding. Fortuna, 33-2-1 (23), proceeded to press the attack after the second deduction and land a good shot or two on Granados, whose face was reddened from the three prior rounds of a physical affair with more pushing, scraping and shoving than punches thrown. Granados, 18-6-2 (12), is the sort of roughneck fighter who could not only handle Fortuna’s scrappiness but took his shots well. The Chicago, Illinois, native fought back to eventually turn Fortuna around and have his back toward the ropes, where Fortuna crouched down. However his momentum took him through the middle ropes with Granados right in front of him. Fortuna dangled out of the ring with the back of his knees grabbing the bottom ropes, and he got up on the canvas in pain.

 

In the moment, it maybe even looked like Granados pushed the former WBA junior lightweight titleholder through but a replay could convince you otherwise. Fortuna was quickly strapped with a neck brace and was on a stretcher before Showtime even got to the replay. A no-decision was ruled by the commission ringside because the fight didn’t go past four rounds, and Granados was left shrugging his shoulders in the ring, just as clueless as everyone in attendance and watching at home.

 

 

 

You can reach Michael Baca II at mikebaca2@gmail.com and follow him at twitter.com/mikebaca2

 

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