‘ShoBox’ results: Radivoje Kalajdzic dominates Travis Peterkin

Undefeated light heavyweight Radivoje “Hot Rod” Kalajdzic (left) vs. Travis Peterkin. Photo credit: Tom Casino/Showtime

Undefeated light heavyweight Radivoje “Hot Rod” Kalajdzic (left) vs. Travis Peterkin. Photo credit: Tom Casino/Showtime

 

Radivoje “Hot Rod” Kalajdzic dominated Travis Peterkin Friday night, knocking him down twice before forcing a stoppage in the fifth round. The light heavyweight contest was the main event of a “ShoBox: The Next Generation” card televised on Showtime and hosted at the Buffalo Run Casino in Miami, Oklahoma.

 

In a fight that was one-sided both competitively and offensively, Kalajdzic wasn’t the one to blame for the contest’s lack of intrigue. The 25-year-old from St. Petersburg, Florida, looked for a fight and let his hands go early but Peterkin wavered at the idea behind his shoulder roll, while firmly weighted on his back foot.

 

Peterkin, Brooklyn, New York, pumped his right jab out there on occasion but not consistently or exhausting enough to call it an offensive threat. The southpaw’s left hand was constantly cocked but rarely was it ever unraveled. It didn’t take long for Kalajdzic to do seemingly whatever he pleased without having to worry about Peterkin and he elected to press forward with his power right hands to the head and body.

 

Peterkin managed to duck and dodge those rights for some time but, as the fight progressed, he often became unbalanced in the sequences when Hot Rod made a charge. Once he started to throw his left more often in the fourth round, his chin could be seen out in the air and there for the taking.

 

Kalajdzic realized that, in the fifth round, but Peterkin made it too easy. “Hot Rod” let off a basic one-two combination and Peterkin just stood there and took it with his hands down before a right hand sent him to the canvas. Peterkin, 26, reluctantly got up and did so staring at his corner. Once action resumed, he left his chin out there again for the taking and, this time, Kalajdzic made him pay with another one-two while he was backing up. A right hand sent Peterkin, 16-1-1 (7), flat on his back and referee Gerald Ritter immediately waved off the bout midway through the round.

 

Kalazdzic, 22-1 (15), did his part and managed to look good against a reluctant opponent, as he tries to overcome his disputed decision loss to Marcus Browne last April.

 

Junior welterweight prospect Ivan “The Beast” Baranchyk, went to the scorecards for the first time as a professional and earned a wide, unanimous decision victory over Wang Zhimin in the process.

 

Unbeaten junior welterweight Ivan Baranchyk (right) vs. Wang Zhiming. Photo credit: Tom Casino/Showtime

Unbeaten junior welterweight Ivan Baranchyk (right) vs. Wang Zhiming. Photo credit: Tom Casino/Showtime

 

Baranchyk, 23, showcased some ferocious power shots early in the fight, and they were just as impressive as the elaborate un-caging of “The Beast” for his ring entrance. After establishing a power jab early in the fight, his overhand rights and uppercuts bellowed after landing on Zhimin’s head and, as the fight progressed through the second round, his ability to survive those shots started to become just as profound.

 

Zhimin, Ningbo, China, was a tough customer and not once did he run away from the danger Baranchyk imposed. He would let off some quick combinations of his own, once Baranchyk took a break in the fourth round, seemingly enthralled that he made it that far. Baranchyk was also becoming wild in there, as it was evident that he was looking for one-punch knockout.

 

The fifth round was a landmark moment for Baranchyk. He had never been past the fourth round in his career and Zhimin started to box well enough to make it interesting to see how the Russian would do in the later rounds. Thanks to the advice of his corner, Baranchyk, 12-0 (10), eventually calmed his wild pace and continued his dominance in a more relaxed tone, with his power jab being the catalyst. Zhimin, 7-1 (3), wasn’t exactly matched well in this one but the 30-year-old displayed a resilient chin and an endearing motive of not backing down.

 

Trey Lippe-Morrison relished the opportunity of his national television debut with a tremendous one-round stoppage of Ed Latimore in a battle of undefeated heavyweights.

 

Undefeated heavyweight Trey Lippe-Morrison (left) vs. Ed Latimore. Photo credit: Tom Casino/Showtime

Undefeated heavyweight Trey Lippe-Morrison (left) vs. Ed Latimore. Photo credit: Tom Casino/Showtime

 

Fighting in front of his home state, Lippe-Morrison got the crowd on its feet quickly once he willingly engaged with Latimore in the opening seconds of the fight. The two traded toe-to-toe for a bit and it looked like a slugfest was about to unfurl but that was until the 90-second mark, when a short right hand from Trey dropped Latimore to the canvas.

 

Latimore, 13-1 (7), got up with ease and his confidence gave off the impression that it could’ve been a flash knockdown but Lippe-Morrison stepped on the gas pedal once the action resumed. He pressed forward with his jab and forced Latimore to fight backward until his back hit the ropes. A lunging right hand from Lippe-Morrison stalled Latimore in his tracks and a follow-up left hook sent him to the canvas a second time, with 60 seconds left in the opening round.

 

Lippe-Morrison, 12-0 (12), who fights out of Freddie Roach’s Wild Card Boxing Club in Hollywood, California, kept the same pace once action resumed. A big overhand right caught Latimore’s temple and he stumbled backward with his hands down. He managed to duck a follow-up right hand from Trey but referee Gary Ritter was already convinced Latimore was finished and rightfully waved off the fight at the 2:19 mark.

 

The 26-year-old son of a former heavyweight titleholder, Tommy Morrison, Trey grabbed and raised Roach to the air in jubilation after his impressive win. It was certainly a fight that brought back the exciting memories of his late father.

 

Ivan “The Volk” Golub increased his knockout streak to seven after forcing referee Gerald Ritter to wave off the fight with James Stevenson in the third round. The welterweight bout was scheduled to go eight.

 

Undefeated welterweight Ivan Golub (right) vs. Jame Stevenson. Photo credit: Tom Casino/Showtime

Undefeated welterweight Ivan Golub (right) vs. Jame Stevenson. Photo credit: Tom Casino/Showtime

 

A Ukrainian fighting out of Brooklyn, New York, Golub took advantage of a clumsy game plan from Stevenson. The Baltimore, Maryland native willingly opened himself up in order to land a knockout shot of his own but the problem was, he couldn’t come close to landing it. Nonetheless, it produced an action fight but Golub was able to separate himself in the second round.

 

Golub, 13-0 (11), landed a perfect counter left hand in the second that had Stevenson visibly shook and fighting against the ropes for the majority of the round. Stevenson, 23-3 (16), survived for the time being but his strategy in the fight never changed. Once again, Golub took advantage.

 

A beautiful, short right hand from Golub sent Stevenson down hard to the canvas in the second half of the third round. It was a highlight reel counterpunch but Stevenson made it to his feet in time, beating referee Gerald Ritter’s 10 count. Golub could see that Stevenson’s legs weren’t all there and he went back to work quickly as his opponent tried to tie him up. Golub fought it off and managed trap Stevenson in a corner in order to impose his wailing left and right hooks. Ritter watched closely and, after Stevenson showed signs of being in danger, waved off the fight with about 10 seconds remaining in the third.

 

 

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